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A Modern Myth





29 notes | Reblog | 2 days ago

564 notes | Reblog | 2 days ago

lowfi666:

Strange occult masonic weirdness is weird.


597 notes | Reblog | 2 days ago

commanderspock:

lohrien

Eowyn and the Witch-king of Angmar by Kimberly80


8,812 notes | Reblog | 3 days ago
archaicwonder:

The real Dracula’s Castle and yes, it’s haunted!Poenari Castle was erected on a most formidable and impenetrable peak in the Carpathian Mountains around the beginning of the 13th century by the Basarab rulers of Wallachia. In the 15th century, one of these rulers was Vlad III, otherwise known as Vlad Tepes, the Impaler or more famously, Dracula. More than anything else, he desired a unified Romania, free from the outside influences of Germany, Hungary and the invading Ottoman Turks. Tepes recognized the huge defense potential of the then dilapidated Poenari Castle and came up with a plan.On Easter Day, 1456, all the locals Tepes suspected of conspiring against him and his family were feasting. While they ate, Tepes surrounded and captured them. All those who were old and infirm he impaled, and then strung them all around the city. As for the younger men, together with their wives and children, he had them taken just as they were, dressed up for Easter, to Poenari where they were put to work restoring the castle until their clothes were so ragged that many were virtually naked. The lucky ones died from mistreatment and exhaustion; those who survived were impaled alive on spikes outside the castle when restorations were complete.Tepes used this castle as a stronghold against Turkish attacks. Legend has it that invading Turks managed to eventually drive him out after dragging cannon up the adjacent cliffs and shooting the walls full of holes. He famously escaped with the aid of three brothers, who mounted horseshoes backward on the hoofs of their mules thus tricking the Ottoman soldiers into the going wrong direction as Tepes and his companions got away.Legend also says that the first wife of Tepes committed suicide at this Poenari Castle. Instead of being taken prisoner by the Turks, she chose to leap from the ramparts of the castle where she died on the rocks below.  The story says that when she died, a river that passed nearby turned red from her blood. It was then known as the The Lady’s River. Today it is the Râul Doamnei which is a left tributary of the Argeş River.Many say that spirits haunt the castle ruins and the surrounding valleys as a direct result of the evil deeds of Tepes. After his death, in 1476, people believed that his relatives did not stay in the castle due to their fear of being haunted by the many souls Tepes tortured. The peasants often talked about the strange sights and sounds that came from that area and never dared to find out the reasons. Recently, some Discovery Channel documentarians spent the night at the castle. In the middle of the night they saw red lights coming up the mountain towards the castle on a non-existent path. They could not find any physical explanation for the ghostly red lights and became so frightened that they left. This was the only time they have ever fled a haunted location.
The SyFy channel’s Ghost Hunters International did an investigation at Poenari Castle. Watch the segment on youtube here.Even though other castles like Hunedoara and Bran are more popularly associated with Tepes, Poenari is the only castle which has a definite historic connection with him.  The castle lies at about 93 miles from Bucharest, the capital of Romania. It is near the town named Curtea de Arges. To see the ruins of Poenari Castle, you must climb 1,426 steps up the mountain though the woods where his impaled victims were left to slowly die. 

More legends about Poenari Castle




More about the history of Poenari Castle and Vlad the Impaler

archaicwonder:

The real Dracula’s Castle and yes, it’s haunted!

Poenari Castle was erected on a most formidable and impenetrable peak in the Carpathian Mountains around the beginning of the 13th century by the Basarab rulers of Wallachia. In the 15th century, one of these rulers was Vlad III, otherwise known as Vlad Tepes, the Impaler or more famously, Dracula. More than anything else, he desired a unified Romania, free from the outside influences of Germany, Hungary and the invading Ottoman Turks. Tepes recognized the huge defense potential of the then dilapidated Poenari Castle and came up with a plan.

On Easter Day, 1456, all the locals Tepes suspected of conspiring against him and his family were feasting. While they ate, Tepes surrounded and captured them. All those who were old and infirm he impaled, and then strung them all around the city. As for the younger men, together with their wives and children, he had them taken just as they were, dressed up for Easter, to Poenari where they were put to work restoring the castle until their clothes were so ragged that many were virtually naked. The lucky ones died from mistreatment and exhaustion; those who survived were impaled alive on spikes outside the castle when restorations were complete.

Tepes used this castle as a stronghold against Turkish attacks. Legend has it that invading Turks managed to eventually drive him out after dragging cannon up the adjacent cliffs and shooting the walls full of holes. He famously escaped with the aid of three brothers, who mounted horseshoes backward on the hoofs of their mules thus tricking the Ottoman soldiers into the going wrong direction as Tepes and his companions got away.

Legend also says that the first wife of Tepes committed suicide at this Poenari Castle. Instead of being taken prisoner by the Turks, she chose to leap from the ramparts of the castle where she died on the rocks below.  The story says that when she died, a river that passed nearby turned red from her blood. It was then known as the The Lady’s River. Today it is the Râul Doamnei which is a left tributary of the Argeş River.

Many say that spirits haunt the castle ruins and the surrounding valleys as a direct result of the evil deeds of Tepes. After his death, in 1476, people believed that his relatives did not stay in the castle due to their fear of being haunted by the many souls Tepes tortured. The peasants often talked about the strange sights and sounds that came from that area and never dared to find out the reasons. Recently, some Discovery Channel documentarians spent the night at the castle. In the middle of the night they saw red lights coming up the mountain towards the castle on a non-existent path. They could not find any physical explanation for the ghostly red lights and became so frightened that they left. This was the only time they have ever fled a haunted location.

The SyFy channel’s Ghost Hunters International did an investigation at Poenari Castle. Watch the segment on youtube here.

Even though other castles like Hunedoara and Bran are more popularly associated with Tepes, Poenari is the only castle which has a definite historic connection with him.  The castle lies at about 93 miles from Bucharest, the capital of Romania. It is near the town named Curtea de Arges. To see the ruins of Poenari Castle, you must climb 1,426 steps up the mountain though the woods where his impaled victims were left to slowly die. 

More legends about Poenari Castle

More about the history of Poenari Castle and Vlad the Impaler


118 notes | Reblog | 3 days ago
littlehade5:

Vlad The Impaler, “The Real Dracula” Home.
Vlad the Impaler, a.k.a. Vlad III, Dracula, Drakulya,  or Tepes, was born in late 1431, in the citadel of Sighisoara, Transylvania, the son of  Vlad II or Dracul, a military governor, appointed by Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund.  Vlad Dracul was also a knight in the Order of the Dragon, a secret fraternity created in 1387 by the Emperor, sworn to uphold Christianity and defend the empire against the Islamic Turks.  Vlad was not called Tepes, which means “”spike” in Romanian, until after his death;  instead, he was known as Vlad Dracula, the added “a” meaning “son of”, so essentially, throughout his life, he was known as the “son of the Devil”.

littlehade5:

Vlad The Impaler, “The Real Dracula” Home.

Vlad the Impaler, a.k.a. Vlad III, Dracula, Drakulya,  or Tepes, was born in late 1431, in the citadel of Sighisoara, Transylvania, the son of  Vlad II or Dracul, a military governor, appointed by Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund.  Vlad Dracul was also a knight in the Order of the Dragon, a secret fraternity created in 1387 by the Emperor, sworn to uphold Christianity and defend the empire against the Islamic Turks.  Vlad was not called Tepes, which means “”spike” in Romanian, until after his death;  instead, he was known as Vlad Dracula, the added “a” meaning “son of”, so essentially, throughout his life, he was known as the “son of the Devil”.


55 notes | Reblog | 4 days ago
mysteryvoicesneverdie:

Dracula’s Castle in Transylvania

mysteryvoicesneverdie:

Dracula’s Castle in Transylvania


87 notes | Reblog | 4 days ago

(Source: bunnyhepburn)


41,550 notes | Reblog | 5 days ago

331 notes | Reblog | 5 days ago

1,577 notes | Reblog | 5 days ago

553 notes | Reblog | 5 days ago
visitheworld:

Père Lachaise Cemetery, the largest cemetery in Paris, France; it is the most visited cemetery in the world and is said to be one of the most haunted cemeteries in Europe (by nora ver).

visitheworld:

Père Lachaise Cemetery, the largest cemetery in Paris, France; it is the most visited cemetery in the world and is said to be one of the most haunted cemeteries in Europe (by nora ver).


1,249 notes | Reblog | 5 days ago
Lucy with her fancy drink last night #21stbirthday #drinks #alcohol  #goingtoturnintodrjuliahoffmanfromdarkshadows

Lucy with her fancy drink last night #21stbirthday #drinks #alcohol #goingtoturnintodrjuliahoffmanfromdarkshadows


3 notes | Reblog | 1 week ago

1,057 notes | Reblog | 1 week ago

(Source: thrumm)


26,788 notes | Reblog | 1 week ago
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